Psycho serien

Psycho Serien 1) Breaking Bad (2008-2013)

15 spannendste Psycho- Kriminal und Thriller-Serien & (Netflix & TV Liste) In der Serie geht es um Adam Price, dessen perfektes Leben mit zwei. Entdecke die besten Serien - Psychopath: Breaking Bad, True Detective, Dexter, Die Brücke - Transit in den Tod, Avatar - Der Herr der Elemente, Monster. „True Detective“ ist eine von Nic Pizzolatto entwickelte Anthologie-Serie, bei der jede Staffel eine abgeschlossene Handlung hat. Die unterschiedlichen Staffeln. Du bist auf der Suche nach einer Übersicht aller Thriller-Serien? Das limapaskennel.se Serien-Archiv ist auf dem neusten Stand und bietet einen umfassenden. Die 90 besten Düster-Serien inklusive Trailer, IMDb-Rating, Genre-Info und Kurz-​Synopsis.

psycho serien

Entdecke die besten Serien - Psychopath: Breaking Bad, True Detective, Dexter, Die Brücke - Transit in den Tod, Avatar - Der Herr der Elemente, Monster. Von Anfang an ist klar, wer der Serienmörder ist: Dem psychopathischen Familienvater Paul Spector (Jamie Dornan) wird genauso viel Zeit eingeräumt wie der. Netflix Psychothriller Filme und Serien. Eine Übersicht aller Netflix Psychothriller Filme und Serien Es wurden 44 Titel gefunden.

Psycho Serien - Netflix Psychothriller Filme und Serien

Ihr liebt das Spiel mit der menschlichen Psyche? Die Karriere bei der Polizei hat sie einst aufgegeben, weil die Arbeit sie aufgefressen hat und sie sich endlich ihrer Familie widmen wollte. Amazon Video User Ratings. Spool's corpse in the bedroom, and Norman takes off his mother's dress. That same year, plans to remake Psycho were announced. Freddie Highmore Beckham Skodje Y. Retrieved 17 October Duane Duke With poe havoc theme Faheya sleazy musician desperate for money, is visit web page the job of assistant manager at the Bates Motel.

All hell breaks loose following the party as aliens arrive on Earth leaving Jesse and The coming-of-age story of young Jesse Ridgway, with a new-age artistic passion, who has to stand up to his mischievous brother and old-world father, all the while slowly losing his mind.

Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites.

Company Credits. Technical Specs. Episode List. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites.

User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions.

Rate This. Episode Guide. Added to Watchlist. Top-Rated Episodes S6. Error: please try again. Everything New on Netflix in June.

My 14th Birthday Movies and TV Shows Seen in Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin.

Episodes Seasons. Edit Cast Series cast summary: Jesse Ridgway Psycho Brother 10 episodes, Zachary Cornatzer Learn more More Like This.

My Virtual Escape — Action Drama Sci-Fi. McJuggerNuggets Video Short Comedy. Psycho Family The Devil Inside Comedy Drama. The Spirit of Ursula Mary goes to Lila's hotel and their argument is overheard by a bartender.

Later, Lila drives over to Norman's house, unaware that Dr. Raymond is watching her from the Bates Motel as she sneaks into the cellar.

While removing her "Mother" costume from a loose stone in the floor, another figure dressed as "Mother" steps out of the shadows and murders her.

Raymond runs up to the house. Lila's body is not in the cellar. Meanwhile, Mary discovers that a car has been retrieved from the swamp, with Toomey's body in the trunk.

Realizing the police will shortly arrive to arrest Norman, Mary returns to warn him. The phone rings in the house, Norman answers, and starts speaking to his "mother".

Mary listens in and discovers that nobody is on the line with Norman. Terrified, Mary runs downstairs into the cellar, and quickly dresses up as Mother to confront Norman.

Someone grabs her from behind, and she plunges the butcher knife into Raymond, who has sneaked back into the house.

A stunned Mary runs downstairs and is confronted by a deranged Norman, who promises to cover up for "Mother".

Mary tries to keep him away, repeatedly stabbing him in the hands and chest. He backs Mary into the fruit cellar to hide and slips on a pile of coal, which avalanches away from the wall, revealing Lila's body hidden behind it.

Mary is now convinced that Norman had been committing the murders. She raises her knife to stab him and is shot to death by the incoming police.

The sheriff inaccurately believes Lila and Mary committed all the murders. That evening, a woman walks up the steps to the Bates' mansion.

Bandaged from his injuries, Norman has set a place for dinner when he hears a knock at the door.

It is Emma Spool, the kindly woman from the diner. Norman gives her a cup of tea. Spool tells him that she is his real mother, that Mrs.

Bates was her sister, who adopted Norman as an infant while Mrs. Spool was institutionalized.

She further reveals that she was the murderer, having killed anybody who tried to harm her son. As she sips the tea, Norman kills her with a sudden blow to the head with a shovel.

Norman is now completely insane again. He carries Mrs. Spool's body upstairs to Mother's room and we hear Mother's voice warn Norman not to play with "filthy girls".

Norman reopens the Bates Motel and stands in front of the house, waiting for new customers as Mother watches from the window upstairs. Maureen Coyle Diana Scarwid , a mentally unstable young nun, is on top of a bell tower about to commit suicide.

When another nun tries to get her to come down, Maureen accidentally pushes her over the railing to her death.

Another nun tells Maureen that she will burn in hell. She is forced to leave the convent after this ordeal. Spool has been missing for over a month.

Duane Duke Jeff Fahey , a sleazy musician desperate for money, is offered the job of assistant manager at the Bates Motel.

Maureen, now the new long-term tenant, has some issues to resolve in her life. She gave up her vows as a nun only days before, and she isn't sure just how she feels about either spiritual or earthly matters.

She is working on an article about serial killers being put back on the streets. Venable is trying to back up her theory that Norman is back to his old ways again.

Norman appears and Venable jumps at the chance to talk with him. Unaware of her ulterior motives Norman opens up to her, but is distracted when an exhausted Maureen enters and sits at the lunch counter.

He is startled by Maureen's presence, because he feels she strongly resembles Marion Crane. Seeing the initials "M.

After a conversation with "Mother", Norman spies on Maureen as she undresses and heads into the bathroom to take a shower.

Keeping "her" word, "Mother" enters Maureen's motel room with plans to kill her. Upon pulling back the shower curtain, it is revealed Maureen has attempted suicide by cutting her wrists, a sight which snaps Norman back to his "normal" side.

Maureen looks up at "Mother" who is so weakened by what "she" sees, "she" lowers the knife. Due to blood loss, Maureen hallucinates and she mistakes Norman, dressed up as "Mother", for the Virgin Mary holding a silver crucifix.

Spool's disappearance. When she leaves, Duane picks up another girl at the bar, Red Juliette Cummins. Norman gets Maureen to the local hospital to save her life.

After she is released, he invites her to stay back at the motel and they begin a romantic relationship.

The same night, Duane and Red arrive at the motel and hear an argument between "Mother" and Norman, but think it's just a TV turned up too loud.

Red and Duane, head to cabin 12 where they make love. Later that night, Red, makes it clear she wants more than just a fling.

Calling him a pig, they argue. Duane, infuriated, throws her out of the cabin. Red heads down to the payphone to call a cab, where she realizes she is wearing her blouse backwards.

As she takes it off to put it on the right way, "Mother" shatters the phone booth door and stabs a trapped Red to death. The next morning, Duane finds Norman scrubbing down the phone booth.

A group from out of town arrive at the motel where they plan to watch the local football game. Tracy comes to find Norman and ask questions about his past and "Mother".

Norman becomes defensive with the reporter and tells her to leave, never to return. Later that night, he and Maureen go to a restaurant, where they dance and talk romantically, while Tracy searches Mrs.

Spool's apartment. She discovers the Bates Motel's telephone number written on a magazine cover. Norman and Maureen return to the motel to find most of the other guests engaged in drunken stupor.

Norman goes with Maureen to her room and they fall asleep in each other's arms having refused to make love. Some time afterwards, Patsy Boyle Katt Shea Ruben , the only sober guest, wakes up Maureen to ensure her safety as Norman had left the door open, a bad idea with all the drunken guests around.

Patsy, needing to use the bathroom, finds the one in Norman's parlor unoccupied, but "Mother" again emerges and slashes her throat.

Norman an homage to the reaction of finding Marion dead in the shower in the original Psycho gasps when he discovers Patsy's body.

He buries her in the motel's ice chest outside the office. Spool has disappeared completely. Outside, Tracy tells Maureen about Norman, and she, rather upset, leaves the motel and goes to stay with Father Brian Gary Bayer , who took care of her at the hospital.

Meanwhile, Tracy is convinced Norman is behind the latest disappearances. Norman searches for his mother all over the house and finds a note from her stating that she is in cabin When Norman arrives at the cabin, he learns it was Duane who took "Mother".

Duane confronts him then attempts to blackmail Norman into paying him off, or he'll turn Norman into the police. He tells Duane he doesn't have that kind of money, but Duane reminds him that Norman has made a lot of cash from his business, and if Norman doesn't give money for his silence, he will go to the police.

He agrees to Duane's blackmail demands, but he then unexpectedly throws an ashtray at Duane's head. They fight and Norman seemingly kills Duane by hitting him several times with his own guitar.

Terrified of what he has done, he blames "Mother" for this. Spool and discovers she was working at the diner before Statler bought it from Harvey Leach.

Tracy meets with Leach, a resident at an assisted living facility, and is informed that Mrs. Spool had also once been institutionalized for murder.

Meanwhile, Norman drives Duane's car to the swamp with Duane and Patsy's bodies in it. Duane turns out to be alive and attacks Norman, who accidentally drives the car into the swamp.

He struggles out of the car while Duane drowns. Tracy reads some old newspapers at her study and discovers about the "Bates kidnapping".

Maureen convinces herself that Norman is her true love. She returns to the motel and takes a shower before visiting Norman at his house.

They share a tender moment at the top of the staircase when "Mother" shouts furiously at Norman, which startles him and causes him to lose grip on Maureen's hands.

She falls down the stairs into the Cupid statue at the base of the stairs. She goes limp and sinks to the floor revealing the arrow had punctured her skull.

Distraught, Norman screams and confronts his mother, saying that he will get her for this. At that moment, Tracy arrives at the motel and tries to find Maureen.

She enters the house only to find her lying dead on the couch of the living room which is filled with lit candles.

Then she sees Norman dressed as "Mother", holding a knife, and tries to flee. She tries to reason with Norman by explaining his family history: Emma Spool, who was in fact his aunt, was in love with Norman's father, but he married her sister, Norma, instead.

Spool, having serious psychological problems, kidnapped Norman when he was a baby after she killed Mr.

Bates, believing Norman was the child "she should have had with him. Spool's corpse in the bedroom, and Norman takes off his mother's dress.

Hunt informs Norman that they may never let him out of the institution again, Norman replies, "But I'll be free I'll finally be free. He smiles sardonically as the screen fades to black and the credits roll.

Alex West Bud Cort is a mentally disturbed youth who was admitted to an asylum for killing his abusive stepfather.

At the asylum, he roomed with Norman Bates Kurt Paul and they eventually became close friends. Years later, Norman dies and Alex learns that he has inherited the Bates Motel.

He travels to Norman's California hometown renamed Fairville for this film; in the original film it was Fairvale and with a little help from teenage runaway Willie Lori Petty and local handyman Henry Watson Moses Gunn , Alex struggles to re-open the motel for business, until rumors about the place being haunted by the ghost of Norman's mother, Mrs.

Bates , are apparently true. Only to find that the haunting was a prank and the ghost was the bank manager, Tom Fuller Gregg Henry , who refused to give Alex a loan by trying to scare him away.

Tom is then forced to help Alex and the others with renovating the motel or face prison for fraud. The motel was soon finished with the renovation.

Meanwhile, Barbara Peters Kerrie Keane runs away from home and ends up staying in Alex's motel for the night, contemplating suicide for getting older, going through three divorces, and not having children.

Barbara meets a teenage girl Khrystyne Haje , who invites Barbara to dance at an after prom party in the motel with her and her teenage friends, including Tony Scotti Jason Bateman , though Barbara felt uncomfortable hanging with young kids.

It is then revealed that Barbara's real name is Sally, and that the teenage girl is her younger self from an alternate dimension who took her own life and is now trapped in "the other side", along with Tony, and other teens who also committed suicide.

Sally tells Barbara that she has a life worth living for, then Sally leaves with the rest of the group.

Barbara leaves the motel the next day, planning to live her life to the fullest. Alex looks at the screen telling viewers, "If you ever need a room, come by.

I can't say for sure what you'll find, but it is what makes the world go around. Fran Ambrose CCH Pounder is a radio talk show host who is talking on the topic of "matricide" when children kill their mothers with guest Dr.

Richmond Warren Frost , who was Norman Bates ' former psychologist. The radio receives a call from Norman Bates Anthony Perkins , who has re-entered society and married his former psychiatrist, Connie Donna Mitchell.

Under the alias of "Ed" possibly a reference to Ed Gein, the killer after whom the character of Norman was modeled , Norman tells his story, which the audience sees as a series of flashbacks set in the s and s.

Some flashbacks are slightly out of order. Due to Norman's sexual repression at her hands, when she was frolicking with him he had an incestuous erection, causing her to dress him in women's clothing and taunt him by calling him "Norma.

Eventually Norman got fed up with her allowing Chet to be in their lives and poisoned them both, albeit reluctantly.

He then developed his infamous multiple personality disorder and stole her corpse to create the illusion that she was alive - whenever her corpse spoke to him, the "Norma" personality would take over.

This caused Norman as "Norma" to kill two women who wanted to have sex with him. Throughout the spaces in the flashbacks, Dr.

Richmond realizes "Ed" is Norman and tries to convince Fran to trace the calls. Richmond's worries are dismissed because they cannot trace the call and they believe they can talk Norman out of the reason he called: he fears he will kill again.

He tells Fran that Connie got pregnant against his wishes and that he does not want another "monster". He then tells Fran he does believe his mother is dead, but he will kill Connie "with my own hands, just like the first time".

He then takes Connie to his mother's house and attempts to kill her, but after Connie reassures Norman that their child will not be a monster, he drops his knife in shame and Connie forgives him.

He then burns the house where all his unhappiness began. As he tries to escape the flames, he hallucinates that he sees his victims, Chet, his mother and eventually himself preserving her corpse.

He and Connie leave the scene with Norman stating, "I'm free. A highway patrol officer awakens her and, suspicious of her agitated state, begins to follow her.

When she trades her car for another one at a dealership, he notes the new vehicle's details. The proprietor, Norman Bates Vince Vaughn , tells Marion he rarely has customers because of a new interstate nearby and mentions he lives with his mother in the house overlooking the motel.

He invites Marion to have supper with him. She overhears Norman arguing with his mother about letting Marion in the house, and during the meal she angers him by suggesting he institutionalize his mother.

He admits he would like to do so, but does not want to abandon her. He cleans the bathroom and places Marion's body, wrapped in the shower curtain, and all her possessions — including the money — in the trunk of her car and sinks it in a nearby swamp Macy , who has been hired by Marion's employer to find her and recover the money.

Arbogast calls Lila to update her and tells her he will contact her again within an hour after he questions Norman's mother.

Arbogast enters Norman's house and at the top of the stairs is attacked by a figure who slashes his face three times with a knife, pushes him down the stairs, then stabs him to death.

She rejects the idea and orders him out of her room, but against her will Norman carries her to the cellar.

While Sam distracts Norman, Lila sneaks into the house to search for his mother. Sam suggests to Norman that he killed Marion for the money so he could buy a new motel.

Realizing Lila is not around, Norman knocks Sam unconscious with a golf club and rushes to the house. When his mother found a lover, Norman went over the edge with jealousy and murdered both of them.

Consumed with guilt, he tried to "erase the crime" by bringing his mother back to life in his mind. When he is "Mother", he acts, talks, and dresses as she would.

Norman imagined his mother would be as jealous of a woman to whom he might be attracted just as he was of his mother's lover, and so "Mother" kills any woman he has feelings for; when Norman regains consciousness, he believes that his mother has committed the crime, and covers up for her.

It is implied that Norman is responsible for the unsolved disappearances of two young girls. Richmond concludes that the "Mother" personality has now taken complete control of Norman's mind.

In a voiceover, "Mother" explains that she plans to prove to the authorities she is incapable of violence by refusing to swat a fly that has landed on her hand.

The final shot shows Marion's car being recovered from the swamp, and then goes to end credits. The series is a television reboot set in the s and chronicle Norman Bates ' early childhood with his mother and how she drove him to become a killer.

The series premiered on March 18, and produced five seasons for a total of 50 episodes. The series was shot in Vancouver with a replica of the Psycho house from Universal Studios Hollywood and a recreation of the original Bates Motel from the first movie.

The original interior sets have also been recreated. Psycho is based on the novel of the same name by Robert Bloch which in turn is based loosely on the case of convicted Wisconsin murderer Ed Gein.

Both had deceased, domineering mothers, and had sealed off one room of their house as a shrine to their mother, and both dressed in women's clothing.

However, there are many differences between Bates and Ed Gein. Among others, Gein would not be strictly considered a serial killer, having officially killed "only" two people.

Hitchcock also faced genre competitors whose works were critically compared to his own and so wanted to film new material. The director also disliked stars' salary demands and trusted only a few people to choose prospective material, including Robertson.

Paramount executives did not want to produce the film and refused to provide the budget that Hitchcock received from them for previous films with the studio.

He proposed this cost-conscious approach to Paramount but executives again refused to finance the film, telling him their sound stages were occupied or booked even though production was known to be in a slump.

Hitchcock countered with the offer to finance the film personally and to film it at Universal-International if Paramount would distribute.

This offer was finally accepted. Hitchcock also experienced resistance from producer Herbert Coleman and Shamley Productions executive Joan Harrison , who did not think the film would be a success.

Hitchcock hired writer James Cavanaugh to write a draft of the screenplay. Unsatisfied with Cavanaugh's screenplay, Hitchcock then hired up-and-coming writer Joseph Stefano to adapt the novel.

The film began shooting in December and would go on to last about a month. It was filmed mostly on the backlot of Universal and in various sound stages.

During shooting, Hitchcock was forced to uncharacteristically do retakes for some scenes. The final shot in the shower scene, which starts with an extreme close-up on Marion's eye and pulls up and out, proved very difficult for Leigh, since the water splashing in her face made her want to blink, and the cameraman had trouble as well since he had to manually focus while moving the camera.

Retakes were also required for the opening scene, since Hitchcock felt that Leigh and Gavin were not passionate enough.

Hitchcock forced retakes until all three elements were to his satisfaction. Psycho was released on June 16, to mixed critical reception and financial success, making thirty-two million dollars in its theatrical run.

The film received four Academy Award nominations. Upset by this, Universal decided to make their own version that differed from Bloch's work.

Holland stated: "I approached it with more trepidation because I was doing a sequel to Psycho and I had an overwhelming respect for Hitchcock.

You didn't want to mess it up, you really had almost a moral obligation to make something that stayed true to the original and yet updated it the same time.

It really was the next step, what happens when Norman gets out". The assistant director of the original Psycho , Hilton A.

Green , was contacted and asked if he wanted to produce the film. Green, fearing that Hitchcock may not have approved of sequels to his films, called Hitchcock's daughter Patricia Hitchcock and asked what she thought of the film.

Patricia Hitchcock gave her blessing to the film, saying that her father would have loved it. The Bates house set was still standing from , but the motel had to be reconstructed.

The film was made much like the first film; it was mostly shot on the backlot of Universal and on a number of sound stages. Several props and set pieces from the original film were found by set designers John W.

Corso and Julie Fletcher. The town of Fairvale seen when Lila Loomis is tailed by Dr. Raymond is actually Courthouse Square , which is located on the Universal Studios backlot in California.

Both Franklin and Holland wanted the film to be a tribute to Hitchcock and the original film; to accomplish this, they added in various in jokes such as the scene when Mary and Norman first go into Norman's mother's room, before they turn the lights on; one can see Alfred Hitchcock's silhouette on the wall to the far right.

Franklin also repeated various shots from the original film such as the shot where Norman walks into the kitchen and sets his jacket down on the chair.

Perkins had difficulty working with actress Meg Tilly due to Tilly never seeing the original film and not being aware of the significance of Perkins' comeback role.

Midway through production, Perkins suggested that Tilly be replaced even though half of her scenes had been shot.

The ending of the film was kept secret during production. The final pages of the shooting script with the ending on it weren't distributed to cast and crew until the last day of filming.

The iconic last shot of the movie with Norman standing in front of the house was used as a Christmas card for various crew members.

When Universal presented concept art for the one-sheet film poster, director Franklin wasn't pleased with it.

It was editor Andrew London who came up with the idea of using the Christmas card photo as the film poster and also came up with the tagline: "It's 22 years later and Norman Bates is coming home".

Psycho II was generally received well by the public and critics and was a surprise box office success. However, film critics Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert both gave the film thumbs down on At the Movies , specifically for its failure to live up to the original.

But if you can accept this movie on its own terms, as a fresh start, and put your memories of Hitchcock on hold, then Psycho II begins to work.

It's too heavy on plot and too willing to cheat about its plot to be really successful, but it does have its moments, and it's better than your average, run-of-the-mill slasher movie.

With the surprise financial and critical success of Psycho II , Universal began development on a second sequel. Writer Charles Edward Pogue was hired to write the screenplay.

In Pogue's first draft of the film, it was Duane who was the killer and had intentionally come to the Bates Motel because he was obsessed with Norman.

Maureen was a neurotic psychologist who had come to the motel to replace Dr. Raymond from the previous film. Pogue had intended to cast original victim Janet Leigh in the role.

Universal rejected these ideas, arguing that Bates had to be the killer and Leigh was wrong for the film.

However, Maureen's actions remained virtually unchanged; her character was merely changed to a young nun. After the second draft of the screenplay was completed, it was sent to Perkins as an acting job.

After Perkins read the script, he wanted to direct the film, saying he would do it for nothing.

Universal agreed to this. When the film went into pre-production, Anthony Perkins asked Psycho II director Richard Franklin to co-direct the film with him; however Franklin declined.

Perkins' main inspiration for the style of this film came from the movie Blood Simple directed by the Coen brothers.

Before production began, he even took the entire cast and crew to a screening of the film. Like the two previous films, it was mostly shot on the backlot of Universal and in a number of sound stages.

Despite Psycho III being Perkins' film directorial debut, the cast and crew have said in interviews that he was enjoyable to work with.

Lee Garlington , who played the waitress Myrna, stated: "I have never to this date met a director who worked equally well with both the cast and crew.

He was excited to be doing it, I adored him". During filming, actor Jeff Fahey suffered an on-set injury. When filming the scene where Norman is hitting Duke with the guitar, Anthony Perkins actually hit Jeff Fahey so hard that it cut his head open and he had to get six stitches.

A shot of Fahey's actual injury was used in the final film. Universal originally wanted to release the film in February but the release was moved to July 2, due to various re-shoots that included the ending.

Psycho III was released on July 2, to a mixed response from critics and financial failure. Roger Ebert gave the film three out of five stars, saying: "Any movie named "Psycho III" is going to be compared to the Hitchcock original, but Perkins isn't an imitator.

He has his own agenda. He has lived with Norman Bates all these years, and he has some ideas about him, and although the movie doesn't apologize for Norman, it does pity him.

For the first time, I was able to see that the true horror in the "Psycho" movies isn't what Norman does - but the fact that he is compelled to do it.

Dave Kehr of The Chicago Reader said: "Perkins tries to imitate Hitchcock's visual style, but most of the film is made without concern for style of any kind, unless it's the bludgeoning nonstyle of Friday the 13th.

Perkins declined involvement in the project and even heavily boycotted it. The film was made as a pilot for a weekly anthology television series, but the series was never picked up.

The film received mostly negative reviews and low Nielson ratings. Perkins wanted to direct the film and even came up with a pitch for the film along with Psycho III screenwriter Charles Edward Pogue; however Psycho III was a critical and financial failure so Universal rejected that idea and Mick Garris was brought in.

He had disliked the two films between I and IV, feeling that they were too commercial and catered to the conventions of slasher movies.

Actress Olivia Hussey was directly offered the role of Mrs. It was the intention of writer Joseph Stefano to make her at a young age as attractive as Norman had been in the first film.

When Henry Thomas was cast as young Norman Bates , Perkins wanted to meet with him and discuss the role. In the documentary The Psycho Legacy , Thomas stated: "Looking back on it now, he knew he had to have this conversation with me but I don't think that he was really into it.

He just gave me a few broad strokes and told me to play the character real, that was it. During filming, Perkins had been diagnosed with HIV and had to receive treatment during production.

Director Mick Garris has stated in numerous interviews that he had some creative control issues with Perkins.

He could be very forceful, just shy of bullying, but also really appreciated helpful direction.

Psycho Serien Video

SerienTipps: 5 geniale Thriller-Serien - SerienFlash

Psycho Serien - Beste Kriminalserien auf Netflix, Maxdome, Prime oder DVD in 2020

Seine Erfahrung wird in der abgelegenen Provinz jedoch schon bald gebraucht. Du willst nichts mehr verpassen? Auch Adam verbirgt etwas vor seiner Familie. Frauen sind Bürger zweiter Klasse. Nachts macht er Jagd auf andere Mörder, die dem Rechtssystem entgehen, um für "Gerechtigkeit" zu sorgen. psycho serien Die Polizistin Marcella Anna Friel hat es nicht einfach. Das kennt man auch z. Mord, Verschwinden und eine dunkle Welt sind beliebte Themen in Serien. In den USA macht sie Als die beiden Schiffe im Packeis stecken bleiben, wird die Https://limapaskennel.se/serien-stream-gratis/streamcloud-the-flash.php von einem unbekannten Wesen in Form eines riesigen Eisbären angegriffen. Daraufhin macht er von seinen Kenntnissen als Jahre später hat Heidi sich ein neues Leben aufgebaut, doch click at this page Vergangenheit lässt continue reading keine Ruhe. Spannend bis zum Schluss und mit acht Staffeln perfekt geeignet für einen Serien-Marathon. Source 3. Rolling Stone Startseite. Doch dies ist für einen Mann ohne Gefühle helene fischer lets dance immer einfach. Mit jeder Menge One piece folgen aber auch verstörenden Einblicken in die Psyche und das Verhalten eines extremen Stalkers ist diese Netflix-Serie eine der interessantesten Eigenproduktionen der letzten Jahre. Bewerte : 0. Alle VOD-Anbieter Gerade erst veröffentlichte Netflix exklusiv die dritte Staffel der seit eigenproduzierten Serie. In 'The Terror' kommt das Grauen aus dem Eis. Unterstützt werden sie dabei von der Psychologin Wendy Carr. Doch das sogenannte Profiling stößt, wie zunächst alle innovativen Ideen, auch. Netflix Psychothriller Filme und Serien. Eine Übersicht aller Netflix Psychothriller Filme und Serien Es wurden 44 Titel gefunden. Von Anfang an ist klar, wer der Serienmörder ist: Dem psychopathischen Familienvater Paul Spector (Jamie Dornan) wird genauso viel Zeit eingeräumt wie der. Streaming-Riese Netflix hat auch viele Serien-Eigenproduktionen im Portfolio. Wir verraten, welche Netflix-Serien die besten sind! Die spannende Serie 'Bates Motel' erzählt die Vorgeschichte zu Hitchcocks Film '​Psycho'. Die Serie porträtiert dabei vor allem Norman Bates. Kriege, Intrigen, und Morde bestimmen das Leben der Einwohner. Schwarze Komödie 1. Ebenso wie die ersten drei Staffeln befasst sich click here diese Serie mit teilweise sehr realen und historischen Fakten. Read article Kultserie dreht sich um die mit mystischen Kräften ausgestattete Vampirjägerin Buffy gespielt von Sarah Michelle Gellardie gemeinsam mit ihren Freunden gegen dunkle Psycho serien charlie sheen aids darunter besonders Vampire und Dämonen — und die Probleme des Erwachsenwerdens duff english. Netflix-Neuigkeiten Einloggen. Er stellt Ansprüche auf sein Recht, Ealdorman von Bebbanburg zu sein. Die Aufgabe führt sie zurück in ihr Elternhaus unter das kritische Auge ihrer Mutter Adora, einer kleinstädtischen Persönlichkeit, die Preaker dazu zwingt, einige persönliche Dämonen zu konfrontieren. Damit sie sich in ihn verliebt, zieht er alle Register und schreckt dabei vor absolut nichts und niemandem zurück.

No need to waste time endlessly browsing—here's the entire lineup of new movies and TV shows streaming on Netflix this month. See the full list.

Title: The Psycho Series — A troubled teen named Isaac struggles to find meaning in his life until he comes across a cutting-edge Virtual Reality Helmet called: "E.

A story of a kid named Jesse and his gaming life and YouTube career. He has a insane dad that abuses him and destroys all his things. It's up to Jesse and his friends to stop psycho Dad But can this only lead to a terrible fate.

After switching in-and-out of character so often by snapping his fingers, Jesse finds that he can longer control his story-telling power.

This causes a blending of worlds, an identity crisis Jesse wakes up in Switzerland with no memory of who he is, being forced to rely on his family and some scrabble letters.

This series follows a cranky old man by the name of Angry Grandpa and his chaotic - Over the top Adventures with his trouble-making son Pickleboy and Pickleboy's girlfriend Bridgette.

Noah Bennet helps a young computer programmer, Jacob Kalder, uncover and take back the lost world of E. E and it's secrets, which is under the run of a mysterious psychopathic hacker who uses the "Overlord" persona and name.

It's been one year since the "Overachievers" series was released, so Jesse decided to host a reunion. All hell breaks loose following the party as aliens arrive on Earth leaving Jesse and The coming-of-age story of young Jesse Ridgway, with a new-age artistic passion, who has to stand up to his mischievous brother and old-world father, all the while slowly losing his mind.

Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites.

Company Credits. Technical Specs. Episode List. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings.

External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. Episode Guide.

Added to Watchlist. Top-Rated Episodes S6. Error: please try again. Everything New on Netflix in June. My 14th Birthday Movies and TV Shows Seen in He admits he would like to do so, but does not want to abandon her.

He cleans the bathroom and places Marion's body, wrapped in the shower curtain, and all her possessions — including the money — in the trunk of her car and sinks it in a nearby swamp Macy , who has been hired by Marion's employer to find her and recover the money.

Arbogast calls Lila to update her and tells her he will contact her again within an hour after he questions Norman's mother.

Arbogast enters Norman's house and at the top of the stairs is attacked by a figure who slashes his face three times with a knife, pushes him down the stairs, then stabs him to death.

She rejects the idea and orders him out of her room, but against her will Norman carries her to the cellar. While Sam distracts Norman, Lila sneaks into the house to search for his mother.

Sam suggests to Norman that he killed Marion for the money so he could buy a new motel. Realizing Lila is not around, Norman knocks Sam unconscious with a golf club and rushes to the house.

When his mother found a lover, Norman went over the edge with jealousy and murdered both of them. Consumed with guilt, he tried to "erase the crime" by bringing his mother back to life in his mind.

When he is "Mother", he acts, talks, and dresses as she would. Norman imagined his mother would be as jealous of a woman to whom he might be attracted just as he was of his mother's lover, and so "Mother" kills any woman he has feelings for; when Norman regains consciousness, he believes that his mother has committed the crime, and covers up for her.

It is implied that Norman is responsible for the unsolved disappearances of two young girls. Richmond concludes that the "Mother" personality has now taken complete control of Norman's mind.

In a voiceover, "Mother" explains that she plans to prove to the authorities she is incapable of violence by refusing to swat a fly that has landed on her hand.

The final shot shows Marion's car being recovered from the swamp, and then goes to end credits.

The series is a television reboot set in the s and chronicle Norman Bates ' early childhood with his mother and how she drove him to become a killer.

The series premiered on March 18, and produced five seasons for a total of 50 episodes. The series was shot in Vancouver with a replica of the Psycho house from Universal Studios Hollywood and a recreation of the original Bates Motel from the first movie.

The original interior sets have also been recreated. Psycho is based on the novel of the same name by Robert Bloch which in turn is based loosely on the case of convicted Wisconsin murderer Ed Gein.

Both had deceased, domineering mothers, and had sealed off one room of their house as a shrine to their mother, and both dressed in women's clothing.

However, there are many differences between Bates and Ed Gein. Among others, Gein would not be strictly considered a serial killer, having officially killed "only" two people.

Hitchcock also faced genre competitors whose works were critically compared to his own and so wanted to film new material.

The director also disliked stars' salary demands and trusted only a few people to choose prospective material, including Robertson.

Paramount executives did not want to produce the film and refused to provide the budget that Hitchcock received from them for previous films with the studio.

He proposed this cost-conscious approach to Paramount but executives again refused to finance the film, telling him their sound stages were occupied or booked even though production was known to be in a slump.

Hitchcock countered with the offer to finance the film personally and to film it at Universal-International if Paramount would distribute.

This offer was finally accepted. Hitchcock also experienced resistance from producer Herbert Coleman and Shamley Productions executive Joan Harrison , who did not think the film would be a success.

Hitchcock hired writer James Cavanaugh to write a draft of the screenplay. Unsatisfied with Cavanaugh's screenplay, Hitchcock then hired up-and-coming writer Joseph Stefano to adapt the novel.

The film began shooting in December and would go on to last about a month. It was filmed mostly on the backlot of Universal and in various sound stages.

During shooting, Hitchcock was forced to uncharacteristically do retakes for some scenes. The final shot in the shower scene, which starts with an extreme close-up on Marion's eye and pulls up and out, proved very difficult for Leigh, since the water splashing in her face made her want to blink, and the cameraman had trouble as well since he had to manually focus while moving the camera.

Retakes were also required for the opening scene, since Hitchcock felt that Leigh and Gavin were not passionate enough. Hitchcock forced retakes until all three elements were to his satisfaction.

Psycho was released on June 16, to mixed critical reception and financial success, making thirty-two million dollars in its theatrical run.

The film received four Academy Award nominations. Upset by this, Universal decided to make their own version that differed from Bloch's work.

Holland stated: "I approached it with more trepidation because I was doing a sequel to Psycho and I had an overwhelming respect for Hitchcock.

You didn't want to mess it up, you really had almost a moral obligation to make something that stayed true to the original and yet updated it the same time.

It really was the next step, what happens when Norman gets out". The assistant director of the original Psycho , Hilton A. Green , was contacted and asked if he wanted to produce the film.

Green, fearing that Hitchcock may not have approved of sequels to his films, called Hitchcock's daughter Patricia Hitchcock and asked what she thought of the film.

Patricia Hitchcock gave her blessing to the film, saying that her father would have loved it. The Bates house set was still standing from , but the motel had to be reconstructed.

The film was made much like the first film; it was mostly shot on the backlot of Universal and on a number of sound stages.

Several props and set pieces from the original film were found by set designers John W. Corso and Julie Fletcher.

The town of Fairvale seen when Lila Loomis is tailed by Dr. Raymond is actually Courthouse Square , which is located on the Universal Studios backlot in California.

Both Franklin and Holland wanted the film to be a tribute to Hitchcock and the original film; to accomplish this, they added in various in jokes such as the scene when Mary and Norman first go into Norman's mother's room, before they turn the lights on; one can see Alfred Hitchcock's silhouette on the wall to the far right.

Franklin also repeated various shots from the original film such as the shot where Norman walks into the kitchen and sets his jacket down on the chair.

Perkins had difficulty working with actress Meg Tilly due to Tilly never seeing the original film and not being aware of the significance of Perkins' comeback role.

Midway through production, Perkins suggested that Tilly be replaced even though half of her scenes had been shot.

The ending of the film was kept secret during production. The final pages of the shooting script with the ending on it weren't distributed to cast and crew until the last day of filming.

The iconic last shot of the movie with Norman standing in front of the house was used as a Christmas card for various crew members.

When Universal presented concept art for the one-sheet film poster, director Franklin wasn't pleased with it. It was editor Andrew London who came up with the idea of using the Christmas card photo as the film poster and also came up with the tagline: "It's 22 years later and Norman Bates is coming home".

Psycho II was generally received well by the public and critics and was a surprise box office success. However, film critics Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert both gave the film thumbs down on At the Movies , specifically for its failure to live up to the original.

But if you can accept this movie on its own terms, as a fresh start, and put your memories of Hitchcock on hold, then Psycho II begins to work.

It's too heavy on plot and too willing to cheat about its plot to be really successful, but it does have its moments, and it's better than your average, run-of-the-mill slasher movie.

With the surprise financial and critical success of Psycho II , Universal began development on a second sequel.

Writer Charles Edward Pogue was hired to write the screenplay. In Pogue's first draft of the film, it was Duane who was the killer and had intentionally come to the Bates Motel because he was obsessed with Norman.

Maureen was a neurotic psychologist who had come to the motel to replace Dr. Raymond from the previous film.

Pogue had intended to cast original victim Janet Leigh in the role. Universal rejected these ideas, arguing that Bates had to be the killer and Leigh was wrong for the film.

However, Maureen's actions remained virtually unchanged; her character was merely changed to a young nun.

After the second draft of the screenplay was completed, it was sent to Perkins as an acting job. After Perkins read the script, he wanted to direct the film, saying he would do it for nothing.

Universal agreed to this. When the film went into pre-production, Anthony Perkins asked Psycho II director Richard Franklin to co-direct the film with him; however Franklin declined.

Perkins' main inspiration for the style of this film came from the movie Blood Simple directed by the Coen brothers.

Before production began, he even took the entire cast and crew to a screening of the film. Like the two previous films, it was mostly shot on the backlot of Universal and in a number of sound stages.

Despite Psycho III being Perkins' film directorial debut, the cast and crew have said in interviews that he was enjoyable to work with.

Lee Garlington , who played the waitress Myrna, stated: "I have never to this date met a director who worked equally well with both the cast and crew.

He was excited to be doing it, I adored him". During filming, actor Jeff Fahey suffered an on-set injury.

When filming the scene where Norman is hitting Duke with the guitar, Anthony Perkins actually hit Jeff Fahey so hard that it cut his head open and he had to get six stitches.

A shot of Fahey's actual injury was used in the final film. Universal originally wanted to release the film in February but the release was moved to July 2, due to various re-shoots that included the ending.

Psycho III was released on July 2, to a mixed response from critics and financial failure. Roger Ebert gave the film three out of five stars, saying: "Any movie named "Psycho III" is going to be compared to the Hitchcock original, but Perkins isn't an imitator.

He has his own agenda. He has lived with Norman Bates all these years, and he has some ideas about him, and although the movie doesn't apologize for Norman, it does pity him.

For the first time, I was able to see that the true horror in the "Psycho" movies isn't what Norman does - but the fact that he is compelled to do it.

Dave Kehr of The Chicago Reader said: "Perkins tries to imitate Hitchcock's visual style, but most of the film is made without concern for style of any kind, unless it's the bludgeoning nonstyle of Friday the 13th.

Perkins declined involvement in the project and even heavily boycotted it. The film was made as a pilot for a weekly anthology television series, but the series was never picked up.

The film received mostly negative reviews and low Nielson ratings. Perkins wanted to direct the film and even came up with a pitch for the film along with Psycho III screenwriter Charles Edward Pogue; however Psycho III was a critical and financial failure so Universal rejected that idea and Mick Garris was brought in.

He had disliked the two films between I and IV, feeling that they were too commercial and catered to the conventions of slasher movies.

Actress Olivia Hussey was directly offered the role of Mrs. It was the intention of writer Joseph Stefano to make her at a young age as attractive as Norman had been in the first film.

When Henry Thomas was cast as young Norman Bates , Perkins wanted to meet with him and discuss the role.

In the documentary The Psycho Legacy , Thomas stated: "Looking back on it now, he knew he had to have this conversation with me but I don't think that he was really into it.

He just gave me a few broad strokes and told me to play the character real, that was it. During filming, Perkins had been diagnosed with HIV and had to receive treatment during production.

Director Mick Garris has stated in numerous interviews that he had some creative control issues with Perkins. He could be very forceful, just shy of bullying, but also really appreciated helpful direction.

I would have to say he was the most difficult and challenging actor I've ever worked with, but he ended up going on and on about how happy he was with the film.

That was gratifying", Garris says. The facade of the Bates Motel and the Bates mansion were re-created at the theme park.

The production was originally to be filmed before the opening of the park but due to delays and the studio's desire to have a high-profile production on the lot, the film was shot while the park was open.

This led to tourists being able to watch the filming of several scenes at the motel and house on the back lot. The film received mixed reviews when first broadcast on Showtime.

Henry Stewart of L Magazine said: "Garris evinces high-grade professionalism, but his comic-book approximations of real emotions—like desire, madness and murderlust—feel empty.

Hitchcock this most certainly ain't. The only real trouble with this film is the bad writing, which, considering that it was the baby of the scriptwriter of the original, Joseph Stefano, is very disappointing indeed.

It tried to make references to the original, like one where Perkins cuts his thumb, and the blood going into the drain mimics the blood in the famous shower scene.

Way too obvious and pretty obnoxious. The audio commentary track that accompanies the DVD release of the film, and the "making-of" documentary Psycho Path that the DVD includes, provide numerous details about where the film strived to remain faithful to the original, and where it diverged.

Some changes are pervasive: as the film opens, it is made clear that it is set in the late s, so minor changes are made throughout the dialogue to reflect the new timeframe.

For example, all the references to money are updated how much Marion Crane steals, how much a car costs, how much a hotel room costs , as are references to terms from the original script like " aspic " that would seem anachronistic in the new setting.

According to Van Sant, in the original the only fully fleshed-out character was Norman Bates ; the other major characters were more iconic, purposely written and portrayed to advance the plot.

Van Sant relied upon his main cast more to flesh out and make consistent their character's motivations and worked with them to determine to what degree their characters were similar to the originals.

William H. Macy chose to stay true to the original, while others, such as Vaughn and Julianne Moore, interpreted the dialogue and scenes from the original film differently.

Moore's version of Lila Crane was much more aggressive than the one portrayed by Vera Miles , and there are differences in Marion Crane's evolving attitudes about the money she stole.

The cinematography and cinematic techniques were consistent between the two films in many memorable scenes, including the shower scene, scenes of the mother, scenes of the swamp, and the scene of Arbogast on the staircase, but other scenes changed significantly, particularly the climax, and the Dr.

Simon monologue at the end, which was much shorter. Van Sant's comments from the commentary track attributes many of the updates to the need to make the film more accessible to a new audience.

Camille Paglia commented that the only reason to watch it was "to see Anne Heche being assassinated", but that "it should have been a much more important work and event than it was.

Many people refer to this film as a duplicate of the film rather than a remake. Film critic Roger Ebert wrote that the film "demonstrates that a shot-by-shot remake is pointless; genius apparently resides between or beneath the shots, or in chemistry that cannot be timed or counted.

He describes it as a "Slow, stilted, completely pointless scene-for-scene remake of the Hitchcock classic with a few awkward new touches to taint its claim as an exact replica.

Psycho , a shot-for-shot remake of the first film is not a sequel since it retells the same events as the original film, but set in Reflecting on the continuity issues, Robert Price writes "It seems that all the different Psychos drift into and out of one another.

There is no real sequence. All are variant versions of the same myth. The deep conflict being rehearsed and resolved in these movies is that of the Oedipal complex.

In , The Psycho Legacy documentary was released as a 2 disc set with the 87 minute documentary and 3 hours of special features.

Psycho has become one of the most recognizable films ever made. The shower scene alone has become one of the most iconic cut scenes in cinematic history.

Psycho is frequently referenced, given homage to or spoofed in television shows such as The Simpsons , South Park , American Dad!

Many critics and filmmakers have cited Psycho as the film that modernized the horror genre. Horror writer David.

Schow stated in The Psycho Legacy "It brought the idea that the killer in a horror film was not a mutant, didn't have dents in his head; he could look like that nice young boy from next door".

The film also brought in a new level of acceptable violence and sexuality in movies. Both Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh spent the rest of their careers being typecasted by the film.

Even Alfred Hitchcock 's films began to decline in critical and financial popularity after the release of Psycho. Hitchcock film scholars argue that for the rest of his career, Hitchcock's films were constantly being compared to Psycho.

The "Psycho" films still maintain a very large fanbase. Various websites dedicated to the franchise such as The Psycho Movies. Two retrospective documentaries have been released detailing the making of all four films including The Making of Psycho and The Psycho Legacy The film also spawned the show Alfred Hitchcock: The Art of Making Movies at Universal Studios Florida , with part of the show detailing how the shower scene was filmed.

Various Psycho related merchandise has been sold ever since the release of the original film. Merchandise includes T-shirts, posters, DVDs, books, stationery, shot glasses, shower curtains, action figures, model house kits, pens and more.

Much of the merchandise is related to the fictional Bates Motel where items commonly found in an actual motel have the Bates Motel logo on them.

A Bates Motel light up sign was released in To coincide with the 50th anniversary of the release of the original film, a Psycho house model kit was released in the U.

Props from all the films are also sold occasionally on eBay. In , a series of graphic novels based on the original Psycho was published by the Innovation Comics group.

Today, the novels are out of print and are very rare to find. A horror adventure game with a key-driven verb interface vaguely based on the same-named film by Alfred Hitchcock.

It has been said that the house, designed by art directors Joseph Hurley and Robert Clathworthy , was loosely based on an Edward Hopper painting called "House by the Railroad".

The house and motel sets were actually empty shells, also known as facades. When the house was originally built, there was no right side of the house, since the right side is never seen on camera in the original Psycho film.

Interiors of the Bates house and motel were constructed on Sound stage A at Universal, just a short walk from the actual exterior locations making production convenient for all involved.

After production had wrapped on Psycho , the house was featured in several television productions including The Virginian , Wagon Train and Boris Karloff's Thriller.

The right side of the house was then added and the set was unceremoniously dubbed "The Psycho House".

The motel was torn down in and the house was moved to an alternate location on the backlot to accommodate the new tour.

In , Richard Franklin and Hilton A. Green announced plans to film Psycho II. The house was then moved to a location that best matched the original hill and only about 40 feet of the motel was actually re-built.

The rest of the motel in the film was a matte painting. The motel in the film was re-modeled to look very Spanish like. This version of the set remained until when the new renovations were taken away and the motel was put back to look the way it did in the original Psycho.

Plans to shoot the movie in Orlando, Florida were set into motion and the film crew constructed a full-scale replica of the Bates Motel and Psycho House at the soon-to-be built Universal Studios Florida.

The final dressing and painting was done by the Psycho IV art department crew in , but the house and motel was fully built in long before the production team was assembled for the project.

After production wrapped, the sets were left as attractions at the park until when it was torn down to make room for another attraction.

In , the Psycho House in California was renovated to preserve the set. All of the rotting wood was replaced and the set had a new paint job.

That same year, plans to remake Psycho were announced. It was originally announced that Gus Van Sant was going to be using the original house and motel sets.

However, the production team built a new house directly in front of the old one, and the motel was updated to look like it was from the s.

The new house was moved next to the original house and remained there for about three years after production.

In , due to popular demand, the remake's house was torn down and the motel was restored to the original way once again.

To this day, the house and motel are still standing on the backlot of Universal and continue to be major tourist attractions. The tram tour features an actor playing Norman Bates coming out of cabin 1 with a body, putting it in the trunk of a car and then wielding a large knife at the tourists as the tram drives away.

An art installation, 24 Hour Psycho , created by artist Douglas Gordon in , and later installed in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, consists of a silent screening of Psycho , slowed down to two frames per second from the usual 24 , so that it lasts 24 hours rather than minutes.

It included interviews with cast and crew from all four Psycho films. It also featured interviews with current horror filmmakers who are fans of the series.

The documentary was written, produced and directed by horror journalist Robert Galluzzo. Galluzo made the documentary because of the lack of information on the sequels and also to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the release of the original film.

To the surprise of some critics and fans, the failed TV pilot Bates Motel and the Gus Van Sant remake were not discussed in the documentary, however originally in the deleted scenes section on the DVD two short segments on the two films were supposed to be on there, however for unknown reasons they were left off of the DVD when it was released.

The documentary sold well, received mostly positive reviews and garnered new interest in the series from horror fans. On April 13, , production started on a film adaptation of Stephen Rebello 's non-fiction book Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho , which follows the complex relationship between Alfred Hitchcock and wife Alma Reville during the filming of Psycho in Produced by The Montecito Picture Company and distributed by Fox Searchlight Pictures , the film was released on November 23, in selected cities with a worldwide release on December 14, A documentary examination of the Psycho shower scene was released on October 13, by director Alexandre O.

Philippe running 91 minutes. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Psycho film series. Paramount Pictures original Universal Pictures.

This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Main article: Psycho novel. Main article: Psycho II novel. Main article: Psycho House.

Main article: Psycho film. Main article: Psycho II film. Main article: Psycho III. Main article: Bates Motel film.

Main article: Bates Motel TV series. This section may be too long to read and navigate comfortably. Please consider splitting content into sub-articles, condensing it, or adding subheadings.

August Main article: The Psycho Legacy. Main article: Hitchcock film. The Unofficial Robert Bloch Website.

Archived from the original on Retrieved Great Movies. Retrieved 25 November Box Office Mojo. Bright Lights Film Journal. November Retrieved 17 October Galluzzo November Icons of Fright Productions.

The L Magazine. April 28, Archived from the original on 12 August Archived from the original on 25 April Web Wombat.

Chicago Sun-Times. The Austin Chronicle. International Herald Tribune. The New York Times. Retrieved April 13, Owen Gleiberman January 24, Variety Magazine.

Robert Bloch 's Psycho. Bates Motel — Book Category. Categories : Psycho franchise Film series introduced in Films about psychopaths Horror film franchises Horror mass media franchises Mass media franchises introduced in American film series Universal Pictures franchises.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file.

Download as PDF Printable version. Richard Franklin. Richard Rothstein. Bernard Hermann Danny Elfman adapting. John L.

Bill Butler.

4 thoughts on “Psycho serien

  1. Sie lassen den Fehler zu. Geben Sie wir werden besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden umgehen.

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *